Vogue 1082 Skirt with Curves

(c) 2014 Soundstitches blog skirtNot very svelt on the hanger, this Vogue 1082 skirt perked up once finished and I wore it soon afterwards to my husband’s company party. It’s made out of green checked wool blend. It’s of some vintage, and I acquired it at a garage sale. I imagine it might have been planned for a matched jacket and skirt. Have a look at the curved pieces in this skirt, which I thought would be flattering. Pieces such as these are cut on the bias, and they risk stretching. A traditional treatment, and the one described in Sandra Betzina’s instructions, is to add twill tape to all of the curved edges. Instead of buying the several yards required, I used the selvedge edges of cottons. My rationale was not only money-saving, but I believed that the selvedges would be less thick and prevent warping of the seams. That didn’t work. Lumps were visible every time on to do other fitting. I ended up removing most of my improvised twill tape. The instructions should have called for stay-stitching instead, which would have minimized stretching but avoided the lumps.

Elements that differ from one side to the other are a challenge for me. A vent, for instance, will have a lining piece different on the right side than the left. And sure enough, that vent threw me off. I will confess to sewing up the whole thing in order to wear it for an evening, complete with extra flaps on the inside to encase the vent.

I wish I had read beforehand this piece of advice from a classic book, Tailoring, by Allyne Bane, from 1968 (McGraw-Hill):

…cutting the wrong layer of lining would be a serious mistake. Because it is difficult at this time to determine exactly what ‘left side’ means, it is not wise to cut one layer of the fabric at this time. Instead, cut both layers the same and tailor-tack the cutting line.

Oh well.

I was thrilled to see that you can get your own copy of Tailoring on Amazon.com. (I got mine at a public library sale of old books.) It’s full of instructions on everything related to tailoring, and some things we don’t associate with tailoring, such as skirt construction, and of course cutting out a lining. I recommend this skirt for anyone with or without curves.

SoundStitches blog Vogue 1082

 

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2 thoughts on “Vogue 1082 Skirt with Curves

  1. Your skirt has some really interesting curved seams . I know they are not the easiest to sew, but yours look great. I made a similar Burda skirt and stay stitching work very well in preventing stretching on the curved seams, without adding any extra bulk.

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