Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Vogue 8742

Vogue sewing patterns SoundStitches sewing blog fashion knit Pacific FabricsI’m making this Vogue look from a rust color ponte knit. I didn’t have enough to make the dress, so I’m making a tunic length top to wear with leggings. So far the look is flattering — another waist/bust/hip enhancing look for most of us.

I searched for other ladies’ results online and the pictures bring home to me the importance of choosing a substantial knit. That means a relatively heavy knit, such as ones you would wear for leggings or pants. Think winter instead of summer weight, and to test in the fabric store, squeeze a good handful of fabric, and see how it regains shape and whether it releases wrinkles soon. The right knit weight glides over your body without clinging (though of course wearing a slip or smooth undergarments further reduces “panty lines”).

In today’s standard patterns that contain both a sleeved and sleeveless look in the same package, the bodice pattern piece is identical. But ready-made sleeveless aren’t like this: looks don’t end at the sleeve cap but rather finish closer to the neck. Imagine you were feeling punk-ish and decided to take an old sleeved sweater from your closet to hack off and make a sleeveless sweater from. You could simply draw a line from the armpit to the top of the sleeve and cut it off. But, it would not result in a flattering look. Ready-made sleeveless looks cup in a bit to flatter the neck, arm and body. The sleeved look on Vogue 8742 works fine, but for the sleeveless look you’ll want to cut out another seam allowance-width of fabric.

Rusty red ponte knit

Rusty red ponte knit

In addition to changing the top’s length, I haven’t used the prescribed single-fold binding. Binding, sold in packages by Wrights, is stiff because it contains polyester along with cotton, and this stiffness just isn’t compatible with knits. Instead I purchased rayon seam binding for the neck and sleeveless armholes. (Pacific Fabrics carries many colors of seam binding in its stores. See if it’s available online too.) While rayon seam binding isn’t stretchy, it’s narrow, lightweight and both edges are finished. You can sew it to the dress fabric, right sides together. Attach it before you sew the shoulder seams, and you can eliminate backstitching. (I take time to suggest this because delicate rayon seam binding easily develops holes after the sewing needle goes over the same spot twice.) The rayon gives a worthwhile professional finish and eliminates the bulk created by twice turning over thick knit.

Early on, I accidentally ruched all the way down to the hem, as designed for the full-length dress. As I work on other details, I wonder what I will do with the hem. I may take out the gathering stitches so it will lie flat at the hem.

Finally, I’ve got to make an alteration where the back of the dress meets the neck. The last time I worked on other aspects of the top, I wondered if I even need a button closure. Most women’s heads measure about 21-22 inches (53-55 cm) around, and if the knit stretches this amount around the neckline, that’s all that’s needed. I’ll need to baste to test that out, and after Thanksgiving, I hope to finish up this rust-colored gem and wear it out of the house!

SoundStitches Sewing Blog CoolHipsterDressThis cool free graphic comes to you from Hipster Vector, which offers free graphics that can be downloaded and manipulated with graphics programs. They can adorn your Web site, blog, or Facebook page — the creator simply asks that you credit them, and so here is the credit for Freepik. The dress comes from a set called Cool Hipster Dress Up Girl — find it at the link above, and search for others. Other free art picks include vintage signage, mustaches, goofy clothing with or without body attached, bowties and badges (the digital kind!). Lots of fun!

And here’s the whole Cool Hipster Dress Up Girl set. For Halloween, I wanna be cool hipster girl!

SoundStitches sewing blog hipster girl dress set

Seattle Seahawks fleeceIn the United States, football season is off to a roaring start. American football season, that is. The season coincides with cooler weather in most of our climes. All that’s for the international folks — now Statesiders, what’s your favorite team, and what’s your favorite thing to make out of NFL team fleece? It’s a great gift for anyone who is a fan. The sewing is simple — no need to finish the raw edges, and fleece is forgiving of imperfect seams.

Single or married, young or old, little or large, a blanket is a great cozy thing to wrap up in while watching the game. Our house has a great wood fireplace and we are most often found in front of it during a game. (So are the cats, unfortunately: Cats + fleece = fur-lined blanket!)

I found NFL Fleece Fabric on Amazon.com and wonder what I could make from it this year…

Jumpsuit from SoundStitches BlogI recently had a once-in-a-lifetime chance to visit Paris and various parts of Belgium, and this must serve as my excuse for being such a slacker this summer in terms of blogging. This post, let’s have a look at this jumpsuit I spotted in a Belgium shop. Many European shops close for lunch, so I was unable to touch and feel this jumpsuit.

At first glance, it seems that only a perfectly straight figure could pull this look off, but maybe not… If you had some extra tummy, it would be smoothed over by the drapey fabric in the waist area. The dark blue color makes this classy, not gauche, so you won’t risk the 1970s jumpsuit look at all. Overall the look is long and lean — very good for petite figures. The thin belt would look good with most figures, and offers a chance to coordinate with shoes, bag or earrings. The look is dressy — I wonder if a frayed cropped denim would make it more casual?

I haven’t noticed many jumpsuit patterns, though I know they’re out there. This would be fairly easy to make, though. It has a square neckline, likely with a facing, and wide straps at the top. I wouldn’t risk wearing a brassiere with straps here, so you’d have to like your strapless. The waist has a simple seamline. You’d want to make sure you’re laying out all pieces on straight-of-grain. I suppose there’s a side zipper, that would make getting in and out easier. Here’s a tutorial from Threads Magazine on how to insert a side zipper.

Altogether, a svelt look that’s worth a try. And I’d love to hear if you’re a fan of the jumpsuit look and where you’ve worn it!

(c) 2014 SoundStitches Sewing blog

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I came across this free-for-reuse picture of an ideal sewing room entitled “Room for a Young Girl.” It seems to have been part of an exhibition, Festival of Britain, in 1951. I’m reminded that Britain was still recovering from the devastation of World War II; there was government of rationing of certain goods into the 1950s. In the Homes and Gardens pavilion, this bed-sitting room was designed by J.D. Binns. Imagine having a room separate from your bedroom — a sitting room! — just for sewing up your next fashion. (Oh wait, I have one of those. Alas, I’m no longer a girl, and to gain this luxury of a room I had to commandeer a room from the rest of my family!)

I suppose the exhibition was designed to show off various products available to the home sewer, including, as the description says: “Dressmaker’s stand by Siegel and Stockman, London. Electric iron manufactured by Easipower Ltd, London. ‘Pillar’ ironing table manufactured by Campbell Engineering Co. Ltd., Bromley, Kent. Portable sewing machine manufactured by The Tailor Bird Sewing Machine Co. Ltd., Sandwich, Kent.”  The “portable” sewing machine listed isn’t show.

The exhibition probably also intended to help those who experienced little of a post-war recovery to imagine themselves — or a daughter — living a bit of luxury. Anyway, I love the photo in all its idealism, and I hope you enjoy too!

ClothespinBagIt’s no way near warm enough or dry enough where I live to hang the laundry out on a clothesline yet. But it’s one of the most enjoyable — and energy-saving — things to do in summer because the laundry dries so quickly and smells lovely. Last year, we really got into it and rarely used the clothes dryer from July to October. (The “smalls” or undies dry in the clothes dryer, if you’re wondering; we do have neighbors!) But one inconvenience is having to, with just one hand free, clip the clothespins back onto the line for next time.

A clothespin bag will do the trick, and for this simple project (called a “peg bag” overseas), I consulted my stash and some guidance from the book Sewing in No Time, a great book by Emma Hardy with lots of projects for the house.

I did not want mine to be frilly (read, discouraging ALL the members of my family from handling the laundry!), so I chose a plaid with warm reds and greens and a bit of blue, and a solid blue backing. There’s a half moon-shaped opening for tossing in the clothespins. The ribbon is a scrap, perhaps from a gift wrapping. Looking at the photo, the ribbon seems to need a little embellishing, which I might do, but it didn’t occur to me looking at the real thing, perhaps because the grosgrain pattern shows on the ribbon but not in the photo. Sewing in No Time uses a child’s wooden clothes hanger, but there aren’t many of those anymore, so I used the last remaining little-kid size hanger I could find. Pressing and top-stitching make the seams look crisp.

Maybe it’s simply that I can’t wait for warmer weather, but having a new clothespin bag on hand will make the dry season sweeter.

Knits Without Fear

SoundStitches copyright 2014 Renfrew TopI had fun making the Renfrew Top from Sewaholic Patterns. My friend Claire, so much more in the know about sewing trends than I, led me to this t-shirt pattern. I’m convinced that it’s not the fitting or sewing that makes sewers avoid knits, but rather mastering the neckline.

Not wanting to use the very nice fabric Claire gave me (“But Claire, you keep it — you like stripes.” “But I have more!”), I resorted to colorblocking from smaller pieces of sweatshirt terry fabric left over from past projects. My colorblocking was partially inspired by a list of Renfrew creations blogged by Making It Well. This warm orange-red is the red that my Spring complexion can wear, and the cream is a warm contrast. It’s rather sporty combo, I think.

Regardless of whether the color combo is your thing, the real success in this top is that I chose a very substantial knit. The cream is terry with Lycra. The orange-red is all-cotton terry.

The length of the pattern’s neckband was 24″. After several stitch-ins and removals, I settled on 22″. This is simply a painful process, but thankfully the fabric was thick enough to identify the stitching to pull, and one is not always so lucky with thinner knits. Go for a long basting stitch, then if the band is right, use a shorter stitch with a bit of zigzag to allow stretch (or a serger). For the hems of all knits, I interface with a 1″ strip. This gives the top-stitched hem a crispness and keeps the hem shape over many washings.

Really, this pattern is not very different from those that the commercial pattern companies issue (such as Simplicity, McCall’s, Kwik Sew). But the great photos of Sewaholic’s top — and all the blogs with cute photos of real women wearing them — are likely inspiring the knit-phobic to give it a try. All knit T’s all have the same components: A bodice, sleeves, and neck style. So you won’t avoid the pitfalls of knit necklines if you buy a commercial pattern — there is always fitting and the challenging neckline. But after you complete a few you’ll become convinced that you need not fear the knit. My next version will be in a thinner knit, and with warmer weather ahead, I look forward to wearing it without the usual fleece or sweater over top.

Renfrew Top by Sewaholic Patterns SoundStitches 2014

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 154 other followers

%d bloggers like this: